When

15th to 17th August, 2013 07:00 am - 07:00 pm

Website: Ancestral Health Symposium

Where

Sheraton Atlanta
165 Courtland Street NE
Atlanta,Georgia 30303
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Thursday, 15th August 2013

Time Capitol Ballroom North Capitol Ballroom Center Capitol Ballroom South Atlanta 1 and 2 Atlanta 3
9:00 am Opening remarks
by Brent Pottenger, M.H.A., M.D. cand.
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Opening remarks

By:
Brent Pottenger, M.H.A., M.D. cand.
August 15, 2013, 9:00 am to 9:15 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North
     
9:05 am      
9:10 am      
9:15 am The Paleolithic Prescription
by Boyd Eaton, M.D., Mel Konner, M.D., Ph.D.
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The Paleolithic Prescription

In 1985 a group under the leadership of S. Boyd Eaton began systematically exploring the implications of hunter-gatherer diet and lifestyle for modern human health. A paper titled “Paleolithic Nutrition,” published (surprisingly to us) in The New England Journal of Medicine, set the tone. While much new evidence has confirmed our initial claims, notably in the realm of controlled clinical trials, we also have to deal with important challenges. Perhaps most importantly, the revolution in genomics has shown decisively that much more genetic change has occurred since the hunting-gathering era than was suspected when we began our work, a potential challenge to the core of the mismatch hypothesis. Konner will lecture on both the confirmations of and the challenges to our original conceptions; then he and Eaton will have a public conversation about them, followed by audience discussion. We hope that open consideration of new ideas and new data will allow us to fairly assess the ongoing value of our model in the face of scientific challenges and popular distortions.

By:
Boyd Eaton, M.D., Mel Konner, M.D., Ph.D.
August 15, 2013, 9:15 am to 10:15 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
     
9:20 am      
9:25 am      
9:30 am      
9:35 am      
9:40 am      
9:45 am      
9:50 am      
9:55 am      
10:00 am      
10:05 am      
10:10 am      
10:15 am Break      
10:20 am      
10:25 am How to Love Randomness: Antifragile Responses in the Human Body and Their Consequences
by Nassim Taleb, Ph.D.
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How to Love Randomness: Antifragile Responses in the Human Body and Their Consequences

We discuss the role of irregularity and nonlinear responses in the distribution of stressors and sources of nutrition. We show how, for example, the distinction Paleo-Nonpaleo is based on a severe misunderstanding of second order effects. Why a certain class of variations, up to a point, are necessary in any organic system. Why modern diseases, from Diabetes to Alzheimer's are caused by misunderstanding of nonlinearities. We examine the branches of medicine that seem to miss the point.

By:
Nassim Taleb, Ph.D.
August 15, 2013, 10:25 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
     
10:30 am      
10:35 am      
10:40 am      
10:45 am      
10:50 am      
10:55 am      
11:00 am      
11:05 am The Consuming Instinct: What Juicy Burgers, Ferraris, Pornography and Gift Giving Reveal About Human Nature
by Gad Saad, Ph.D.
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The Consuming Instinct: What Juicy Burgers, Ferraris, Pornography and Gift Giving Reveal About Human Nature

I offer a synopsis of my work in the evolutionary consumption area. This will be achieved by discussing key tenets from my books (The Consuming Instinct and The Evolutionary Bases of Consumption) including that: (1) many consumption acts can be mapped onto four key Darwinian modules (survival, mating, kin selection, and reciprocal altruism); and (2) cultural products (e.g., song lyrics, movie plotlines) are fossils of the human mind that highlight a shared biological-based human nature.

By:
Gad Saad, Ph.D.
August 15, 2013, 11:05 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
     
11:10 am      
11:15 am      
11:20 am      
11:25 am      
11:30 am      
11:35 am      
11:40 am      
11:45 am Break      
11:50 am      
11:55 am Sexual Fitness and Women's Fertility Cycles
by Geoffrey Miller, Ph.D.
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Sexual Fitness and Women's Fertility Cycles

There’s much more to fitness than eating Paleo and doing CrossFit. There’s also ‘sexual fitness’ – how well your body and mind work in attracting, courting, and retaining mates. During human evolution, sexual selection through mutual mate choice shaped many physical traits (e.g. height, muscularity, beards, penises, breasts, buttocks) and behavioral traits (e.g. language, creativity, humor, music, art, magnanimity, foreplay, copulation). This talk explains these aspects of sexual fitness, why they are universally attractive yet marginalized in ‘civilized’ education, and why they are especially attractive to women at peak fertility, just before ovulation.

By:
Geoffrey Miller, Ph.D.
August 15, 2013, 11:55 am to 12:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
     
12:00 pm      
12:05 pm      
12:10 pm      
12:15 pm      
12:20 pm      
12:25 pm      
12:30 pm      
12:35 pm HFCS Litigation
by J. Michael Hayes, J.D.
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HFCS Litigation

A federal lawsuit has been initiated in Buffalo, New York against the High Fructose Corn Syrup manufacturers on behalf of a teenage girl who has type 2 diabetes. The claim is that the HFCS is
"a cause" of her developing that disease. This presentation will briefly discuss the perceived merits of that claim in terms of Strict Product Liability and Failure to Warn litigation.

By:
J. Michael Hayes, J.D.
August 15, 2013, 12:35 pm to 12:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
     
12:40 pm      
12:45 pm Lunch      
12:50 pm      
12:55 pm      
1:00 pm      
1:05 pm      
1:10 pm      
1:15 pm      
1:20 pm      
1:25 pm      
1:30 pm      
1:35 pm      
1:40 pm What is Optimal Health? Complexity Science, Chaos Theory and Its Impact on Ancestral Health
by Grayson Wheatley, M.D.
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What is Optimal Health? Complexity Science, Chaos Theory and Its Impact on Ancestral Health

An ancestral lifestyle relies on alignment of nutrition, physical activity and sleep for achieving optimal health and well-being. New research in complexity science - a rapidly evolving body of work that studies dynamic networking systems - has cast doubt on the effectiveness of how we measure expected outcomes in health and medicine. Complex systems may better explain human health by focusing not on single data elements as “cause-and-effect” but on the interactions among complex biological systems. The implications of complexity science and chaos theory on leading an ancestral lifestyle and achieving optimal health will be discussed.

By:
Grayson Wheatley, M.D.
August 15, 2013, 1:40 pm to 2:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Traditional Food as Medicine in the Coast of Ecuador: A Documentary
by Pilar Egüez-Guevara, Ph.D.
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Traditional Food as Medicine in the Coast of Ecuador: A Documentary

In the summer of 2012, a group of filmmakers, cooks, and anthropologists traveled to Bahía de Caráquez, a small coastal city in the province of Manabí, Ecuador. Gathering the perceptions and memories about eating, feeding, and healing from our grandmothers and other elderly men and women living in Bahía and its surroundings, we conducted oral histories, filmed cooking sessions with expert elder cooks, and explored the everyday local and traditional food life and culture in Bahía. Our goal was to recover and rediscover the healing power of ancestral foods and techniques, while providing a venue for empowerment and revaluing of mostly elderly low-income women who are bearers of these often locally devalued culinary and healing knowledges and expertise. The presentation will show the 15-minute short documentary followed by a brief commentary.

By:
Pilar Egüez-Guevara, Ph.D.
August 15, 2013, 1:40 pm to 2:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
   
1:45 pm    
1:50 pm    
1:55 pm    
2:00 pm    
2:05 pm Why Women Need Fat: Three Evolutionary Puzzles
by Will Lassek, M.D.
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Why Women Need Fat: Three Evolutionary Puzzles

One puzzle is why human males have such a strong preference for women with hourglass figures and low weights that can compromise fertility. The second is why slender young women typically have about one third of their weight in body fat, more than bears starting to hibernate, and why human infants are also very fat. Finally, why do women typically gain another twenty pounds or more during their reproductive years? The answer may lie in the roles that fat plays in providing essential fatty acids needed for the growth of a very large brain and in regulating overall fetal growth.

By:
Will Lassek, M.D.
August 15, 2013, 2:05 pm to 2:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Find Your Why
by Kyle Maynard
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Find Your Why

Throughout my life, I have achieved things that go beyond what some people said was possible. In 2012 I became the first man to bear crawl to the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro. People presented logical arguments as to why there was no way a quadruple amputee could climb the highest mountain in Africa. Many more look at the ancestral health movement in the same way. They say large scale change is hopeless. We have to accept that it won’t be easy and that nothing significant happens without persistent effort. Your why is your reason for being. Find your why. Speak your truth.

By:
Kyle Maynard
August 15, 2013, 2:05 pm to 2:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
   
2:10 pm    
2:15 pm    
2:20 pm    
2:25 pm    
2:30 pm    
2:35 pm    
2:40 pm    
2:45 pm Networking - Scientists and Self Experimenters/Patients
by Any attendees
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Networking - Scientists and Self Experimenters/Patients

Research scientists, self experimenters, patients

By:
Any attendees
August 15, 2013, 2:45 pm to 3:15 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North
Networking - Health Care Providers and Business Owners
by Any attendees
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Networking - Health Care Providers and Business Owners

Clinical Providers- MD, DO, ND, PT etc
Nutrition Providers
Business owners/entrepreneurs

By:
Any attendees
August 15, 2013, 2:45 pm to 3:15 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South
Networking - Policy and Information Sharing
by Any attendees
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Networking - Policy and Information Sharing

Policy Changers
Activists
Journalists
Bloggers

By:
Any attendees
August 15, 2013, 2:45 pm to 3:15 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2
Networking - Fitness
by Any attendees
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Networking - Fitness

Gym Owners
Personal Trainers
Coaches
Athletes

By:
Any attendees
August 15, 2013, 2:45 pm to 3:15 pm
Hall: Atlanta 3
2:50 pm
2:55 pm
3:00 pm
3:05 pm
3:10 pm
3:15 pm Liberation from the Industrial Food System
by Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., Robb Wolf, B.S.
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Liberation from the Industrial Food System

By:
Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., Robb Wolf, B.S.
August 15, 2013, 3:15 pm to 3:55 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Safety and Feasibility of the Wahls Diet™, a Modified Paleo Diet, to Treat Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS)
by Terry Wahls, M.D.
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Safety and Feasibility of the Wahls Diet™, a Modified Paleo Diet, to Treat Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS)

A safety and feasibility study of the Wahls Diet™ and targeted nutraceuticals was conducted in ten patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis who could still ambulate 25 feet is reported. Here we report the development of the study diet, safety and compliance with the diet. Data will also include intake of macro and micronutrients at baseline and 12 months.

By:
Terry Wahls, M.D.
August 15, 2013, 3:15 pm to 3:55 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Academic
   
3:20 pm    
3:25 pm    
3:30 pm    
3:35 pm    
3:40 pm    
3:45 pm    
3:50 pm    
3:55 pm Break    
4:00 pm    
4:05 pm The End of Paleo: Is the Ancestral Health Movement Going Mainstream? I Wouldn’t Bet on It!
by Hamilton Stapell, Ph.D.
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The End of Paleo: Is the Ancestral Health Movement Going Mainstream? I Wouldn’t Bet on It!

The current Ancestral Health movement is often thought to be on the verge of going mainstream. Many within the movement believe this would lead to positive health (and financial) outcomes for both individuals and society as a whole. However, the transition from a small, highly-devoted group of adherents to a mass following will be far more difficult than commonly assumed. In addition, this presentation will gauge the current size of the Ancestral Health movement by examining empirical data. It also identifies the two types of individuals that typically go paleo. The key commonality between both groups is a very high level of motivation, which also suggests limited penetration of the Ancestral Health movement in the future.

By:
Hamilton Stapell, Ph.D.
August 15, 2013, 4:05 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Human 1.0: Ecology and Wellbeing
by Richard Manning
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Human 1.0: Ecology and Wellbeing

We offer a synthetic argument designed to suggest how understandings across disciplines might be assembled and unified to better understand human well-being. We argue that all paths lead to the brain, more specifically, support brain function and in turn well-being.

By:
Richard Manning
August 15, 2013, 4:05 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
   
4:10 pm    
4:15 pm    
4:20 pm    
4:25 pm    
4:30 pm    
4:35 pm    
4:40 pm    
4:45 pm Break    
4:50 pm    
4:55 pm The Real Paleo Challenge: How a Fad on the Fringe Can Become a Force for Change
by Adele Hite, R.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. cand.
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The Real Paleo Challenge: How a Fad on the Fringe Can Become a Force for Change

What can be done to transform the ideas and values of the ancestral health community into a human rights revolution that improves the health of all Americans? Although the importance of science cannot be underestimated, perceptions and policies are also shaped by calls for reform that have broad appeal, as demonstrated by the social history of the low-fat agenda that resulted in the US Dietary Guidelines. Understanding the origins of this policy provides lessons in how complex problems of our current system can be framed to convey a sense of urgency and injustice that give momentum to calls for reform.

By:
Adele Hite, R.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. cand.
August 15, 2013, 4:55 pm to 5:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Ancestral Principles in Clinical Practice Panel
by Anastasia Boulais, M.B.B.S., B.Med.Sc., Don Wilson, M.D., Emily Deans, M.D., Jacob Egbert, D.O., John Barrett, M.D., Victoria Prince, M.D./Ph.D. student
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Ancestral Principles in Clinical Practice Panel

Evolutionary and ancestral thinking promotes the understanding of health and disease. These concepts can be beneficial in many aspects of medicine, from primary care to subspecialties and everything in between. A number of physicians are interested in utilizing ancestral and evolutionary thinking in clinics and on hospital floors and have successfully integrated some of this thinking into their practices. Nonetheless, putting these principles into practice can come with challenges. This panel of physicians will discuss how they use ancestral thinking in clinical care, as well as some of the challenges they face.

By:
Anastasia Boulais, M.B.B.S., B.Med.Sc., Don Wilson, M.D., Emily Deans, M.D., Jacob Egbert, D.O., John Barrett, M.D., Victoria Prince, M.D./Ph.D. student
August 15, 2013, 4:55 pm to 5:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Clinical
   
5:00 pm    
5:05 pm    
5:10 pm    
5:15 pm    
5:20 pm    
5:25 pm    
5:30 pm    
5:35 pm Book Signing (in Georgia pre-function area)
by Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., Gad Saad, Ph.D., Kyle Maynard, Mel Konner, M.D., Ph.D., Terry Wahls, M.D.
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Book Signing (in Georgia pre-function area)

Americans are growing more disconnected from their food. Many people are catching on to the increased nutritional benefit of joining a CSA or sourcing grass-fed beef. However the reasons to source your food from a small scale sustainable farm go beyond nutrition to include: economical, ethical, and environmental reasons. Learn the many ways you can liberate yourself and others from the industrial food system. By breaking free from agribusiness and the food giants, you are not only making a smart nutritional choice, but making a bold statement for many issues including better treatment of animals, biological diversity, land use, social justice and a more robust community.

By:
Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., Gad Saad, Ph.D., Kyle Maynard, Mel Konner, M.D., Ph.D., Terry Wahls, M.D.
August 15, 2013, 5:35 pm to 6:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North
   
5:40 pm    
5:45 pm    
5:50 pm    
5:55 pm    
6:00 pm    
6:05 pm Yoga Movement Workshop (Georgia pre-function area)
by Lynn Brandli
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Yoga Movement Workshop (Georgia pre-function area)

This yoga class will emphasize creating alignment in body for optimizing systems: muscular strength and suppleness; bone and joint positioning; space and support for organic body; mindfulness for mental health; and breath as a tool for accessing self.

By:
Lynn Brandli
August 15, 2013, 6:05 pm to 7:00 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North
   
6:10 pm    
6:15 pm    
6:20 pm    
6:25 pm    
6:30 pm    
6:35 pm    
6:40 pm    
6:45 pm    
6:50 pm    
6:55 pm    

Friday, 16th August 2013

Time Capitol Ballroom North Capitol Ballroom Center Capitol Ballroom South Atlanta 1 and 2
9:00 am Fat-Soluble Vitamin Interactions: An Ancestral Perspective
by Chris Masterjohn, Ph.D.
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Fat-Soluble Vitamin Interactions: An Ancestral Perspective

Vitamins A, D, and K interact to provide for optimal growth, strong bones and teeth, and protection of soft tissues such as kidneys and blood vessels from pathological calcification. However, the current trend to promote supplementation with vitamin D while ignoring the roles of vitamins A and K and even discouraging substantial intakes of vitamin A has the potential to increase the risk of pathological calcification. This talk will present the biochemistry and clinical implications of fat-soluble vitamin interactions within the context of an ancestral health perspective.

By:
Chris Masterjohn, Ph.D.
August 16, 2013, 9:00 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
Parasites are Paleo: The Hidden Costs of Modern Hygiene
by Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac.
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Parasites are Paleo: The Hidden Costs of Modern Hygiene

The consequences of departing from an ancestral diet and lifestyle have become increasingly clear over the past few decades. But one of the most profound differences between the modern, industrialized world and the ancestral environment is also the least visible: the microbiome. In this presentation, we'll review evidence suggesting that our health may be dependent in part on parasites and other organisms that we co-evolved with, and examine the consequences of the loss of these "Old Friends". We'll also discuss practical strategies for cultivating your microbiome and protecting against modern disease.

By:
Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac.
August 16, 2013, 9:00 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
   
9:05 am    
9:10 am    
9:15 am    
9:20 am    
9:25 am    
9:30 am    
9:35 am    
9:40 am Evaluation of the Impact of a Paleolithic Diet on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Lipoproteins in a Law Enforcement Population
by Robb Wolf, B.S., Scott Hall, M.D.
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Evaluation of the Impact of a Paleolithic Diet on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Lipoproteins in a Law Enforcement Population

Traditional cardiovascular risk factors including cholesterol may not provide the best tools for predicting individuals at risk for future cardiovascular disease and current insulin resistance. Novel and emerging evaluations of lipoproteins may provide a more accurate assessment of future cardiovascular risk. In an observational study of a small group of law enforcement officers, we studied the changes in both traditional and nontraditional risk factors when instructed in a “paleo” diet over 6 months. Overall, we found an encouraging impact on both traditional and nontraditional risk factors over the course of the study. It is proposed that a “paleo” diet supplemented with exercise has a positive effect on cardiovascular risk factors and may be a treatment recommendation for individuals at risk.

By:
Robb Wolf, B.S., Scott Hall, M.D.
August 16, 2013, 9:40 am to 10:05 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
     
9:45 am      
9:50 am      
9:55 am      
10:00 am      
10:05 am Break
10:10 am
10:15 am Survival Panel
by Billy Berger, John Durant, Kevin Dalton, M.A., R.P.A., Robb Wolf, B.S.
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Survival Panel

Our ancestors endured a hazardous world. This panel will discuss the skills they needed to survive and pass on their genes, expertise that is no longer commonplace in our modern world: hunting, gathering (urban and wilderness), avoiding toxins, cooking in the wild, fighting/self defense, building weapons, and wilderness medicine. Economic questions pertaining to cooperation, movement, environmental awareness, and the need for technological development will be discussed.

By:
Billy Berger, John Durant, Kevin Dalton, M.A., R.P.A., Robb Wolf, B.S.
August 16, 2013, 10:15 am to 11:15 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Walk the Talk
by Esther Gokhale, L.Ac.
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Walk the Talk

There is compelling evidence that over the past 100 years the populations of industrialized countries have drifted away from the somatic heritage of their forbearers. We have adopted postural habits which are dramatically different from those used historically and still found in non-industrialized peoples today. Modern “adaptations”, such as tucking the pelvis, have had detrimental effects on the biomechanics of our gait and structure, generating an epidemic of foot, knee and back problems. Restoration of healthy and sustainable functioning requires a return to natural alignment, our Primal Architecture. The Gokhale Method is a systematic and effective program for attaining this.

By:
Esther Gokhale, L.Ac.
August 16, 2013, 10:15 am to 11:15 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
A Whole Body Approach To the Brain
by Martha Herbert, Ph.D, M.D.
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A Whole Body Approach To the Brain

Not only neurons but glial cells, blood flow, blood-brain barrier integrity, extracellular matrix, and further tissue components of the brain are impacted by health and diet. With a poor diet and an accumulation of noxious environmental exposures the integrity of these physical systems can be degraded. This can compromise the capacity of the physical structures of the brain to generate finely synchronized oscillatory rhythms. This talk will review this brain biology and in vivo brain imaging methods of studying it, as well as the importance of such research for making a powerful case for evolutionarily grounded dietary transformation.

By:
Martha Herbert, Ph.D, M.D.
August 16, 2013, 10:15 am to 10:55 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Academic
Clinical Case Workshop for Providers
by Lauren Noel, N.D., Rick Henriksen, M.D.
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Clinical Case Workshop for Providers

This session is designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration and information exchange between the various types of clinical providers. Our group of providers from a variety of backgrounds will work through several different patient presentations while learning about our similarities and differences in how we provide patient care. By the end of the session, you will gain professional allies from different clinical backgrounds. You will also leave with specific diagnostic and treatment protocols designed by the groups. This will be a practical, fun, and interactive workshop. Case topics will be provided to participants for minimal preparation. Pre-registration recommended. The session is capped at 30 participants. If more than 30 participants sign up, we will choose 30 participants to include a variety of clinical backgrounds.

By:
Lauren Noel, N.D., Rick Henriksen, M.D.
August 16, 2013, 10:15 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: Clinical
10:20 am
10:25 am
10:30 am
10:35 am
10:40 am
10:45 am
10:50 am
10:55 am  
11:00 am  
11:05 am  
11:10 am  
11:15 am Break
11:20 am
11:25 am Moses the Microbiologist: Religion as a Cultural Adaptation to Infectious Disease
by John Durant
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Moses the Microbiologist: Religion as a Cultural Adaptation to Infectious Disease

Wash your hands! The 19th century physician Ignaz Semmelweis gets credit for discovering the hygienic value of hand-washing, yet injunctions to ‘wash your hands’ appear thousands of years earlier in the Bible (Exodus 30:17-21). This talk explores the rise of non-animistic, monotheistic religious faiths (e.g., Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as cultural adaptations to infectious disease, which sharply increased since the Agricultural Revolution and the emergence of cities. Potential adaptations include hand-washing, bathing, quarantine, burial practices, food codes, food inspection, bodily fluids, sexual codes, and more. A hypothesis for the emergence of monotheism is proposed.

By:
John Durant
August 16, 2013, 11:25 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
It Ain't Your Great-Grandparents World: Environmental Toxicity - Understanding It, and What to Do About It
by Tim Gerstmar, N.D.
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It Ain't Your Great-Grandparents World: Environmental Toxicity - Understanding It, and What to Do About It

Humanity has released approximately 100,000 new chemical compounds into the environment, mostly in the past 100 years. Compounds our bodies have never seen before and weren't designed to deal with. In this talk we will discuss some of the common environmental toxins and how they have been shown to be harmful to human health. We will also discuss: testing methods for quantifying toxicity, how the body detoxifies (the seven organs involved) and provide simple methods audience members can take to reduce their toxic burden, as well as briefly discuss more intensive, physician practices for detoxification for people who need it.

By:
Tim Gerstmar, N.D.
August 16, 2013, 11:25 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Clinical
Open Your Heart & Reclaim Your Health
by Eva Selhub, M.D.
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Open Your Heart & Reclaim Your Health

The key to resilience is to reverse the negative impacts of stress and to initiate stability within the mind-body system. Eva Selhub, MD, provides a practical framework to rid the body of the ravaging effects of stress, overcome hurtful past life events, and shape an empowered personal future. She addresses how to change the body’s physiology quickly and lastingly through the deliberate evocation of biochemical reactions that counteract the unhealthy effects of fear and stress. This allows us to experience the myriad health benefits of nature’s own antidote: love and affection.

By:
Eva Selhub, M.D.
August 16, 2013, 11:25 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
11:30 am
11:35 am
11:40 am
11:45 am
11:50 am
11:55 am
12:00 pm  
12:05 pm Lunch
12:10 pm
12:15 pm
12:20 pm
12:25 pm
12:30 pm
12:35 pm
12:40 pm
12:45 pm
12:50 pm
12:55 pm
1:00 pm Ketogenic Diets for Athletic Performance Panel
by Ben Greenfield, M.S., C.S.C.S., C-I.S.S.N., Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed, Jimmy Moore, Mark Sisson, Robb Wolf, B.S.
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Ketogenic Diets for Athletic Performance Panel

Conventional wisdom regarding exercise has long been centered on the concept that you need to consume copious amounts of carbohydrates in order to be fueled for your activity. But looking at the nutritional template left by our Paleo ancestors who very likely went through periods of time when they would need to perform in a ketogenic state due to lack of food or a reliance on high-fat, animal-based protein sources, it seems humans were meant to run well and even optimally in a ketogenic state.

By:
Ben Greenfield, M.S., C.S.C.S., C-I.S.S.N., Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed, Jimmy Moore, Mark Sisson, Robb Wolf, B.S.
August 16, 2013, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
The Intersection of Nutrition and Autoimmune Disease
by Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D.
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The Intersection of Nutrition and Autoimmune Disease

Autoimmune disease is estimated to affect 50 million Americans—and the prevalence continues to increase. While genetic predisposition accounts for one third of an individual’s risk for autoimmune disease, environmental factors such as infection, diet and lifestyle make up the other two thirds. In particular, nutrient-poor diets rich in refined carbohydrates and omega-6 polyunsaturated fats are major contributors. Beyond the promotional effects of these diets on inflammation and gut dysbiosis, micronutrient deficiencies result in impaired immune function and have been well documented in many autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, specific micronutrient deficiencies have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases.

By:
Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D.
August 16, 2013, 1:00 pm to 1:40 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Academic
The Dose Response of High Intensity Circuit Training - Health or Performance?
by James Fitzgerald, B.P.E.
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The Dose Response of High Intensity Circuit Training - Health or Performance?

The fitness industry is consistently trying to find ways of efficiency in exercise prescription. For the past decade, high intensity interval training (HIIT) has been used in numerous formats to try and create "faster ways" of getting results. HIIT when combined with mixed modal training (MMT) has not been properly tested to ensure a proper prescription of exercise. Through evaluations in general health measures and physiological testing we have found successful principles to use when prescribing HIIT and MMT.

By:
James Fitzgerald, B.P.E.
August 16, 2013, 1:00 pm to 1:25 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
Psychology Workshop
by Vivian Shelton, Psy.D.
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Psychology Workshop

As Ancestral Health practitioners, we act as change agents. But, sometimes facilitating change and getting our clients/patients to reach their health goals can be quite complex. For some, a web of physiological, psychological, and environmental challenges can make committing to self-care and a lifestyle change more difficult. This workshop will be a client-focused interactive session to provide the practitioner with better understanding of the roadblocks that make change more difficult and offers strategies to capitalize on your client’s resources and supports to make possible success to reach their health goals. All practitioners working to facilitate health and wellbeing are welcome.

By:
Vivian Shelton, Psy.D.
August 16, 2013, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: Clinical
1:05 pm
1:10 pm
1:15 pm
1:20 pm
1:25 pm Paleo Parenting: A Biomechanical Perspective
by Katy Bowman, M.Sc.
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Paleo Parenting: A Biomechanical Perspective

Children come with a myriad of developmental reflexes that are often suppressed through Western parenting practices. Parents wishing for a culture-free perspective on topics such as breastfeeding, shoe-wearing, infant exercise and baby-devices will find benefit in a biomechanical explanation of how the behaviors of present-day hunter-gatherer children differ from industrialized ones.

By:
Katy Bowman, M.Sc.
August 16, 2013, 1:25 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
1:40 pm  
1:45 pm  
1:50 pm    
1:55 pm    
2:00 pm Poster Session (in Georgia pre-function area)
by Aaron Blaisdell, Ph.D., Amanda Irish, M.P.H., C.E.I.D.E., Brad Dieter, M.S., Ph.D. cand., Cecilia Silva, Ph.D., Csilla Ari, Ph.D., Dominic D’Agostino, Ph.D., Gabi Lewis, B.A., Grant Schultz, B.S., J. Brett Smith, Jimmy Moore, Keith Bell, Kendall Kendrick, N.T.P., Kristi Beguin, B.S., Lloyd Burnett, C.P.T., Marissa Reeder, M.S., Paul Ratté, N.D, Tyler Graham
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Book Signing (in Georgia pre-function area)
by Esther Gokhale, L.Ac., Mark Sisson, Robb Wolf, B.S.
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Book Signing (in Georgia pre-function area)

By:
Esther Gokhale, L.Ac., Mark Sisson, Robb Wolf, B.S.
August 16, 2013, 2:00 pm to 3:25 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South
PRIMALity Movement Snacks (drop in any time between 2-3 for a few minute break from the poster session)
by Darryl Edwards
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PRIMALity Movement Snacks (drop in any time between 2-3 for a few minute break from the poster session)

Drop in any time between 2:00-3:00 for a few minute break from the poster session. This is not meant as a full ‘Playout’ like his other sessions, but is meant as a place to get away from the crowd and play for a little while.

By:
Darryl Edwards
August 16, 2013, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: General
2:05 pm
2:10 pm
2:15 pm
2:20 pm
2:25 pm
2:30 pm
2:35 pm
2:40 pm
2:45 pm
2:50 pm
2:55 pm
3:00 pm  
3:05 pm Meditation Workshop - Introduction to the Relaxation Response
by Eva Selhub, M.D.
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Meditation Workshop - Introduction to the Relaxation Response

This workshop will introduce the benefits of meditation or elicitation of the relaxation response. Different modalities will be briefly reviewed and an experiential exercise/meditation will follow to enable individuals to understand how elicitation of the relaxation response can help achieve better health and well-being.

By:
Eva Selhub, M.D.
August 16, 2013, 3:05 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: General
3:10 pm
3:15 pm
3:20 pm
3:25 pm Fishy Business: How a Complex Supply Chain, Poor Market Standards, and Environmental Mismanagement Undermine Healthy and Sustainable Seafood Consumption
by Mark Gibson, M.A.
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Fishy Business: How a Complex Supply Chain, Poor Market Standards, and Environmental Mismanagement Undermine Healthy and Sustainable Seafood Consumption

Seafood should be part of any evolutionarily-informed, science-based diet. Early humans ate seafood over 165,000 years ago during the middle Paleolithic Era, and medical research continues to expand the list of health benefits from eating seafood. But not all seafood is created equal, and picking the right seafood for your health and the environment is more difficult than ever. This is due to problems in seafood production and supply, such as overfishing, seafood fraud, a lack of market standards, and the rise of aquaculture. These issues are explored and easy-to-implement recommendations are offered to facilitate healthy, sustainable seafood consumption.

By:
Mark Gibson, M.A.
August 16, 2013, 3:25 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
Brain Food: The Vital Connection between Diet and Mental Health
by Georgia Ede, M.D.
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Brain Food: The Vital Connection between Diet and Mental Health

Discover the important connection between diet and psychiatric disorders. All common conditions will be surveyed, but special attention will be given to those with the most scientific research behind them: ADHD, Mood/Anxiety disorders, and Eating Disorders. Learn how the Western diet disrupts the delicate balance of micronutrients, essential fatty acids, and neurotransmitters in the brain. Understand how the silent blood sugar/hormonal roller coaster destabilizes mood, energy, and sleep patterns. Learn about the fascinating connection between food sensitivities and ADHD. Maximize your brain’s potential by finding out which dietary changes are most worth making and why.

By:
Georgia Ede, M.D.
August 16, 2013, 3:25 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Clinical
Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth
by Allison Siebecker, N.D., MSOM, L.Ac.
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Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth

Many people who try an Ancestral Diet don’t get adequate relief for their digestive complaints. A key reason why may be the presence of SIBO. This presentation will discuss symptoms, causes, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of SIBO. A simple breath test can diagnose SIBO and treatments include diet, antibiotics, herbal antibiotics, elemental diet, and probiotics. Central in all treatment of SIBO is a low- carbohydrate, grain-free diet (Specific Carbohydrate Diet, Gut and Psychology Diet, modified Low Fodmaps Diet). Discussion will include why an ancestral diet can benefit digestion and how the SIBO diets differ from standard Paleo/Primal diets.

By:
Allison Siebecker, N.D., MSOM, L.Ac.
August 16, 2013, 3:25 pm to 4:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Clinical
3:30 pm
3:35 pm
3:40 pm
3:45 pm
3:50 pm
3:55 pm
4:00 pm
4:05 pm Break Nutrition Consulting Workshop
by Amy Kubal, M.S, R.D., Melissa Hartwig, CISSN, RKC.
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Nutrition Consulting Workshop

This Nutrition Counseling and Coaching workshop is designed to help participants develop their counseling skills to better reach, relate to and help their clients. It will be a hands on, interactive session in which participants will be given the information they need to effectively counsel and coach clients using paleo principles. We will also discuss how to breakdown scientific and complex topics and cover aspects of material/form design, available resources and tools that will be helpful in practice. A fun and informative session.

By:
Amy Kubal, M.S, R.D., Melissa Hartwig, CISSN, RKC.
August 16, 2013, 4:05 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: Clinical
4:10 pm
4:15 pm Give Them Grains? Analyzing Approaches to World Hunger
by Alyssa Rhoden, Ph.D.
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Give Them Grains? Analyzing Approaches to World Hunger

Feeding the world is a compelling problem that is expected to worsen. A proposed solution is to increase the number of available calories by diverting more crops from animal feed to direct human consumption. I analyze this approach, taking into account the types of food that can be produced. The results indicate that current crops are rather poor at delivering nutritious food and that repurposing grains is an unlikely solution to world hunger. I will discuss alternative methods by which we can maximize production of nutritious foods and the importance of the ancestral health community’s involvement in the sustainable agriculture movement.

By:
Alyssa Rhoden, Ph.D.
August 16, 2013, 4:15 pm to 4:40 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
The 21st Century Fitness Professional - a New Paradigm
by Keith Norris
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The 21st Century Fitness Professional - a New Paradigm

The fitness professional of the future will be tasked with much more than simply counting reps or clocking time. In addition to properly blending the "art and science" of exercise programming and prescription, this professional must truly become a health and wellness "concierge". The fitness professional of the future will be required to not only recognize the need for, but offer points-of-contact for tangent diagnostics and treatment. In addition, the fitness professional will then be required to piece the results of these outside diagnostics together to form a comprehensive path forward for the client.

By:
Keith Norris
August 16, 2013, 4:15 pm to 4:40 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
Hypothalamic Inflammation: How (Some) Fats May Be Making People Fat
by Kyle Mamounis, B.S., Ph.D. cand.
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Hypothalamic Inflammation: How (Some) Fats May Be Making People Fat

Emerging consensus in obesity research points to defective central energy balance and orexigenic signaling brought on by local hypothalamic inflammation as the primary causative agent in overweight and obesity. Endocannabinoid tone as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukins and fatty acid signaling through toll-like and nod-like receptors implicate fore mostly certain fatty acids and also hyperglycemia, molecular oxidants and more as producing this dysregulation in a conflict of literature that needs to be sifted through critically, built upon experimentally and like other health related research areas can be looked at through an ancestral health framework.

By:
Kyle Mamounis, B.S., Ph.D. cand.
August 16, 2013, 4:15 pm to 4:40 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Academic
4:20 pm
4:25 pm
4:30 pm
4:35 pm
4:40 pm Cycles and Circles: An Introduction to Pasture and Grassland Ecology
by Peter Ballerstedt, Ph.D.
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Cycles and Circles: An Introduction to Pasture and Grassland Ecology

Humans are children of the savannas – grassy plains dotted with trees and shrubs – not the woodlands. Grasslands are the largest ecosystems in the world. The proportion of the earth's land area covered by grasslands is estimated at 3.5 billion hectares (8.6 billion acres), representing 26% of the world land area and 70% of the world agricultural area. Grasslands remain vital to humans. Approximately 1/3 of the world’s meat supply comes from ruminants – herbivorous animals capable of pre-gastric fermentation. Understanding the ecological fundamentals of pastures and grasslands permits an informed discussion of a wider adoption of a paleo/primal way of eating.

By:
Peter Ballerstedt, Ph.D.
August 16, 2013, 4:40 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
Is Your Sprint Training HIITing You In the ANS?
by Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed
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Is Your Sprint Training HIITing You In the ANS?

In recent years, and partially driven through the Ancestral Health movement, high-intensity interval training (HIIT – in its various guises) has become the training mode de jour. But are we over-prescribing the dose of this training? A review of the current research literature on this suggests that high-intensity interval and sprint-type sessions induce a large amount of fatigue in the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Such ANS fatigue can have detrimental effects ranging from sleep disturbances through to HPA axis and stress-related issues. This session discusses the optimal dose for such forms of intense training.

By:
Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed
August 16, 2013, 4:40 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
The Role of Omega 3 Oils in the Treatment of Chronic Inflammation
by Jeff Leighton, Ph.D.
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The Role of Omega 3 Oils in the Treatment of Chronic Inflammation

Inflammation is associated with virtually all chronic, progressive diseases such as heart disease, vascular disease, asthma, IBS, autoimmune diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and even chronic neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. The signals that induce inflammation are multifactorial. High dose omega 3 has the potential to be as or more effective than pharmaceutical therapies. We will report on a series of omega 3 studies that compared dose response, dose timing, (e.g. once a day or twice a day), and food intake (with or without) in four separate cohorts.

By:
Jeff Leighton, Ph.D.
August 16, 2013, 4:40 pm to 5:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Clinical
4:45 pm
4:50 pm
4:55 pm
5:00 pm
5:30 pm PRIMALity (Primal Playout) - meet in the hotel lobby
by Darryl Edwards
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PRIMALity (Primal Playout) - meet in the hotel lobby

Have you forgotten the joy of movement? Do you want to improve strength, fitness and agility without doing punishing drills and mindless activities? Join Darryl Edwards (The Fitness Explorer) with his engaging approach to solo, partner and group based playouts that will inspire you, get you to incorporate endless variety – while making sure you have a tremendous amount of fun doing it.

By:
Darryl Edwards
August 16, 2013, 5:30 pm to 6:15 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
     
5:35 pm      
5:40 pm      
5:45 pm      
5:50 pm      
5:55 pm      
6:00 pm      
6:05 pm      
6:10 pm      

Saturday, 17th August 2013

Time Capitol Ballroom North Capitol Ballroom Center Capitol Ballroom South Atlanta 1 and 2
8:00 am PRIMALity (Primal Playout) - meet in the hotel lobby
by Darryl Edwards
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PRIMALity (Primal Playout) - meet in the hotel lobby

Have you forgotten the joy of movement? Do you want to improve strength, fitness and agility without doing punishing drills and mindless activities? Join Darryl Edwards (The Fitness Explorer) with his engaging approach to solo, partner and group based playouts that will inspire you, get you to incorporate endless variety – while making sure you have a tremendous amount of fun doing it.

By:
Darryl Edwards
August 17, 2013, 8:00 am to 8:45 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
     
8:05 am      
8:10 am      
8:15 am      
8:20 am      
8:25 am      
8:30 am      
8:35 am      
8:40 am      
9:00 am Disordered Eating In the Modern World
by Emily Deans, M.D.
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Disordered Eating In the Modern World

Our modern world has become host to many people with disordered eating, among them binge eaters, anorexics, bulimics, and orthorexics. The majority of women in a recent, large US poll reported disordered eating behaviors and poor body image. In my presentation I will use peer-reviewed literature and histories of eating disorders to explore how a Western diet may be contributing to our troubled eating behaviors.

By:
Emily Deans, M.D.
August 17, 2013, 9:00 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Clinical
Insulin and Obesity: Reconciling Conflicting Evidence
by Stephan Guyenet, Ph.D.
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Insulin and Obesity: Reconciling Conflicting Evidence

The pancreatic hormone insulin regulates the trafficking and metabolism of carbohydrate and fat. Since insulin influences fatty acid flux in fat tissue, and manipulating insulin can influence body fatness, this has raised the possibility that insulin plays a role in common obesity. Two competing hypotheses propose that 1) elevated insulin is a compensatory response to insulin resistance that develops with fat gain, or 2) elevated insulin outpaces insulin resistance and favors fat gain. Each hypothesis appears to be supported by a large amount of evidence. This presentation will outline a framework capable of reconciling this seemingly conflicting evidence.

By:
Stephan Guyenet, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 9:00 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Academic
  Combat Movement Session
by Kyle Maynard
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Combat Movement Session

Learn a few cool facts about the history and evolution of combat and experience the physical and mental adaptations yourself. While I couldn’t convince AHS13 program chair, Kamal Patel, to let me bring a cage to the conference room, we’ll still be simulating a combat athlete’s training environment. Together we’ll do two short bodyweight HIIT (high intensity interval training) sessions and practice sweet skills that would make an assailant three times your size whimper.

By:
Kyle Maynard
August 17, 2013, 9:00 am to 10:00 am
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: General
9:05 am  
9:10 am  
9:15 am  
9:20 am  
9:25 am  
9:30 am  
9:35 am  
9:40 am Gallbladder Disease in Children: Separating Myths from Facts
by Francisco Cervantes, M.D., Marivic B. Torregosa, M.S., Ph.D., Ned Kock, Ph.D.
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Gallbladder Disease in Children: Separating Myths from Facts

In this presentation, we will discuss various aspects of gallbladder disease, with a focus on children. The presentation will be based on data from 2116 patients of the Laredo Pediatrics & Neonatology. The patients, 1041 boys and 1075 girls, are largely first generation American-born children of Hispanic descend – a group at very high risk of developing gallbladder disease. This presentation will dispel several myths, and lay out a case for a strong association between gallbladder disease and abnormally high body fat levels.

By:
Francisco Cervantes, M.D., Marivic B. Torregosa, M.S., Ph.D., Ned Kock, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 9:40 am to 10:05 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Clinical
The Case Against Nutritional Supplements
by Todd Becker, M.S., M.A.
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The Case Against Nutritional Supplements

Over the past century, industrialized societies have seen a meteoric rise in the so-called diseases of civilization: obesity, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, autoimmune disease and cancer. These disorders are often associated with apparent "deficiencies" in critical nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and hormones. This talk will examine the arguments for and against supplementation, together with the evidence from interventional studies. The focus will be on the supplementation with Vitamin C, Vitamin D, and calcium. I will argue that the case for supplementation as a long-term preventive strategy has not be made, and often overlooks the compensating effects of homeostatic regulation.

By:
Todd Becker, M.S., M.A.
August 17, 2013, 9:40 am to 10:05 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
 
9:45 am  
9:50 am  
9:55 am  
10:00 am    
10:05 am Break The Whole9 Seasonal Model for Health Workshop
by Dallas Hartwig, M.S., P.T., Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed
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The Whole9 Seasonal Model for Health Workshop

Pre-registration recommended. Most hunter-gatherer peoples experience natural and biologically appropriate oscillations in their sleep patterns, activity, and nutrient intake with the change of the seasons. A circa-annual rhythm is deeply entwined with our genetic heritage, and we believe that the nearly complete modern departure from that seasonal pattern has contributed to the decline of human health in the industrial age. Furthermore, it is our view that seasonally mismatched nutrition, activity, and sleep patterns can erode long-term health, even if each individual component is technically “Paleo” or ancestrally appropriate. We discuss our Seasonal Model for Health in both "corrective" and "optimal" phases.

By:
Dallas Hartwig, M.S., P.T., Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed
August 17, 2013, 10:05 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2
10:10 am
10:15 am Processed Foods and Processed Friends: Is Facebook a Neolithic Agent of Disease?
by Tony Federico, B.S.
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Processed Foods and Processed Friends: Is Facebook a Neolithic Agent of Disease?

Human beings crave social connection in much the same way that we crave sugary, salty, and fatty foods. In this sense, smartphone enabled social media use parallels the fast food drive-through. Chronic daily use of social media can create dependency and is a threat to emotional and psychological well-being just as over consumption of energy dense foods can lead to diabetes, heart disease, and other diseases of civilization. Moderating the consumption of "processed friends" is just as important as moderating the consumption of processed foods for maintaining and improving total health and wellness.

By:
Tony Federico, B.S.
August 17, 2013, 10:15 am to 10:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Paleo: Necessary But Not Sufficient
by Seth Roberts, Ph.D.
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Paleo: Necessary But Not Sufficient

Persistent lack of progress by mainstream (non-evolutionary) medicine suggests evolutionary thinking is necessary for progress, but many examples – involving Weston Price, sleep, depression, weight control, omega-3, acne, depression, and fermented foods -- suggest it is far from sufficient. Evolutionary thinking helps solve health problems because it greatly narrows the possibilities worth study but it does not narrow the possibilities far enough (there is too much uncertainty) to by itself produce practical solutions. For example, evolutionary thinking helped me find a new theory of weight control but I had learn more to find a practical way to lose weight.

By:
Seth Roberts, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 10:15 am to 10:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
 
10:20 am  
10:25 am  
10:30 am  
10:35 am  
10:40 am Diet, Inflammation, and Depression
by Amber Dukes, M.Sc., Ph.D. cand.
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Diet, Inflammation, and Depression

Depression is an insidious issue in the US and elsewhere. Lifestyle habits that are very different from our ancestral environment may be to blame, and one particularly problematic area is food choice. Depressive symptoms share much in common with the adaptive features of sickness behavior, which is functional when operating in an environment of ancestrally normal immune stressor. Modern diets likely activate the immune system (primarily the inflammatory response) and induce the cascade of adaptive responses that collective make up sickness behavior. Due to their similarities, these may then diagnosed as depression. In this talk, I discuss the links among diet, depression, and inflammation, as well as highlighting some specific dietary components that contribute to this response.

By:
Amber Dukes, M.Sc., Ph.D. cand.
August 17, 2013, 10:40 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Clinical
Ancestral Health in the Undergraduate Classroom: Educating the Next Generation
by Risa Stein, Ph.D.
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Ancestral Health in the Undergraduate Classroom: Educating the Next Generation

Undergraduate students constitute a receptive group of intelligent and motivated individuals. Unfortunately, traditional health psychology courses often address topics from sleep to cancer as distinct units unrelated to one another and characterized by unique etiologies. Moreover, such basic information is typically accompanied by very little practical advice relevant to young adults. The Health Psychology course I teach is presented through an evolutionary perspective with The Paleo Diet Solution serving as the text. Results pertaining to student receptivity to this approach and its impact on personal health changes will be presented.

By:
Risa Stein, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 10:40 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
The Physiology and Biochemistry of the Paleolithic Diet for Weight Reduction
by David Pendergrass, Ph.D.
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The Physiology and Biochemistry of the Paleolithic Diet for Weight Reduction

The physiology and biochemistry interactions of an individual using Paleolithic nutrition will be compared to an individual on the USDA recommended diet to demonstrate why Paleolithic Nutrition results in a success weight loss.

By:
David Pendergrass, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 10:40 am to 11:05 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Academic
10:45 am
10:50 am
10:55 am
11:00 am
11:05 am Break
11:10 am
11:15 am What Are the Health Policy Implications of Ancestral Health Research for Obesity?
by Jason Robert, Ph.D.
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What Are the Health Policy Implications of Ancestral Health Research for Obesity?

How does the environment get under our skin, and why should that matter for health policy in regard to obesity? In this presentation, I offer a multi-disciplinary exploration of the various ways in which ancestral health research ought to - but in fact may not - impact political strategies for addressing obesity in the US and beyond.

By:
Jason Robert, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 11:15 am to 11:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
The Perfectly Healthy Meal—How Ancestral and Gourmet Culinary Practices Guide Us to Satisfying and Nourishing Food
by Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., Russ Crandall, M.H.A.
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The Perfectly Healthy Meal—How Ancestral and Gourmet Culinary Practices Guide Us to Satisfying and Nourishing Food

We examine the principles of recipe and meal design in three approaches – standard Paleo, traditional cuisines, and Perfect Health Diet – to evaluate their similarities and differences. We then compare and contrast how various traditional recipes are implemented in the three approaches, and discuss the relative merits of each approach. Our goal is to answer the question: how can we synthesize the best of each approach to design the most healthful, satisfying, nourishing, delicious food possible?

By:
Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., Russ Crandall, M.H.A.
August 17, 2013, 11:15 am to 11:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
Nutrition for the Eyes, Brain and Heart: An Eye Doctor's Perspective
by Shilpi Mehta, M.A., O.D.
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Nutrition for the Eyes, Brain and Heart: An Eye Doctor's Perspective

Ocular health is strongly connected to systemic body health especially in cardiovascular, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. The eye is the window to the health of the body and inflammation elsewhere can manifest symptoms in the eye. I suggest an anti-inflammatory Paleolithic inspired diet is likely to improve and possibly prevent ocular diseases such as dry eyes, cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma, etc. which have inflammatory origins. I will discuss common ocular conditions that have inflammatory causes, an evolutionary perspective on eye diseases, and offer practical recommendations for food and supplements to optimize eye health, which also help the body, especially the heart and brain.

By:
Shilpi Mehta, M.A., O.D.
August 17, 2013, 11:15 am to 11:40 am
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
11:20 am
11:25 am
11:30 am
11:35 am
11:40 am Paleofantasy or Paleofantastic? Interdisciplinary Reconstruction of the Paleolithic Diet
by Miki Ben-Dor, M.B.A., Ph.D. cand.
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Paleofantasy or Paleofantastic? Interdisciplinary Reconstruction of the Paleolithic Diet

Several anthropologists have stated that there were many Paleolithic diets, presumably questioning the meat/fat centric Paleo practice or the ancestral paradigm altogether.
A review of recent findings relating to the reconstruction of Paleolithic diets from various scientific areas of enquiry will be presented and likely ratios of animal to plant sourced food will be discussed. It will be argued that despite the apparent variability in Paleolithic diets, valid practical dietary guidance can be gained from their study.

By:
Miki Ben-Dor, M.B.A., Ph.D. cand.
August 17, 2013, 11:40 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
Advancing Food Scholarship by Invoking Ancestral Wisdom
by Karla Blaginin, Ph.D. cand.
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Advancing Food Scholarship by Invoking Ancestral Wisdom

Social research on contemporary gastronomy is not a field grounded in academic tradition. Food’s inter-disciplinary nature complicates the scholarship. Food is fundamental in its importance to humanity, and the field must evolve. Multi-disciplinary literature on food presenting scholarship addressing the historical, the contemporary and the methodological is reviewed in this study. The selected works defer to is the existence of a temporally grounded knowledge, an Ancestral Wisdom, that has been largely neglected by academia. The advancement of contemporary food scholarship, and hence, successful public policy is dependent on challenging the present scientific age’s penchant towards linear thinking and lab-situated reliability.

By:
Karla Blaginin, Ph.D. cand.
August 17, 2013, 11:40 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Academic
Carbs as a Hormetic Stressor – Evolutionary and Performance Advantage or Horrible Idea?
by Mike T Nelson, M.S., Ph.D. cand.
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Carbs as a Hormetic Stressor – Evolutionary and Performance Advantage or Horrible Idea?

The use of a low carb Paleo style of eating works great for many, but could it be better? Historically, the intake of macronutrients has varied widely between cultures. Could carbs be viewed as hormetic stressor to those on a low carb diet, thus improving their performance and health even further?

This presentation proposes that the ability of the body to use both fats and carbs (metabolic flexibility) is an essential marker of health and performance. This increased adaptability would have been an evolutionary advantage.

Could some carbs serve as an important hormetic stress to increase survival advantage and exercise performance?

By:
Mike T Nelson, M.S., Ph.D. cand.
August 17, 2013, 11:40 am to 12:05 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
11:45 am
11:50 am
11:55 am
12:00 pm
12:05 pm Lunch
12:10 pm
12:15 pm
12:20 pm
12:25 pm
12:30 pm
12:35 pm
12:40 pm
12:45 pm
12:50 pm
12:55 pm
1:00 pm
1:05 pm Modern Pressures, Poor Sleep: How Sleep Loss Changes How We Live
by Dan Pardi, M.S., Ph.D. cand.
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Modern Pressures, Poor Sleep: How Sleep Loss Changes How We Live

Over the past 40 years, self-reported sleep duration in the United States has decreased by almost 2 hours (h). Artificial light, elongated work schedules and digital entertainment encourage a sleep deprived condition in society. Insufficient sleep promotes slow thinking, poor focus, unreliable memory, weak executive decision making, poor insights and planning capabilities, and alters economic preferences under risky situations. Combined, these impairments lead to significant differences in performance, behavior, decision making, and life choices. Over time, existing under this condition can lead to an entirely different direction of life than what might have otherwise been possible for an individual.

By:
Dan Pardi, M.S., Ph.D. cand.
August 17, 2013, 1:05 pm to 1:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
Feed Your Head: The Under-Recognized Role of a Targeted Diet in Brain Function
by Shauna Young, Ph.D., CTN
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Feed Your Head: The Under-Recognized Role of a Targeted Diet in Brain Function

From observed commonalities of hundreds of clients over the last seven years, Dr. Shauna Young will identify an overlooked primary contributing cause to the skyrocketing incidence of various degrees of Autism, and other ASDS’s, as well as the adult spectrum’s of OCD, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, and supply successful dietary remedies for possibly a large majority of these cases. Her breakthrough work and completely unique results are highly significant due to the fact that few in traditional medicine are making claim to any major understanding around these pervasive health problems that are severely impacting our youth and adults in epidemic proportions.

By:
Shauna Young, Ph.D., CTN
August 17, 2013, 1:05 pm to 1:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Clinical
Heat and Health; Paleo Myths and the Other Metabolic Hormones, Leptin and mTOR
by Ron Rosedale, M.D.
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Heat and Health; Paleo Myths and the Other Metabolic Hormones, Leptin and mTOR

Many people now recognize the importance of insulin. However, there are other pre-paleolithic, ancient metabolic pathways that may be even more critical to health, in particular leptin, and mTOR. How does diet affect these pathways and therefore aging and the chronic diseases of aging and health? Is there relevance to physiologic insulin resistance? Safe starches? Low carbohydrate diet and hypothyroidism? What are the detriments to health of eating excess protein? How much protein is too much? I will talk about the science of aging as it relates to these questions, metabolic pathways, and current dietary recommendations for maximal health.

By:
Ron Rosedale, M.D.
August 17, 2013, 1:05 pm to 1:45 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
 
1:10 pm  
1:15 pm  
1:20 pm  
1:25 pm  
1:30 pm  
1:35 pm  
1:40 pm  
1:45 pm Break  
1:50 pm  
1:55 pm Circadian Rhythms: Their Significance in Human Health, and the Major Factors Affecting Them
by Paul Jaminet, Ph.D.
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Circadian Rhythms: Their Significance in Human Health, and the Major Factors Affecting Them

Circadian rhythms are crucial for health, and a variety of lifestyle factors, including sleep, exercise, social interactions, light exposure, and food intake, influence them. This talk reviews the evidence for their influence upon health, examines why they are so important to our biological functioning, develops a lifestyle program that optimizes circadian rhythms, and reflects upon the evolutionary reasons why a circadian rhythm enhancing lifestyle is so beneficial.

By:
Paul Jaminet, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 1:55 pm to 2:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Intermittent Fasting and Carbohydrate Restriction in Cancer Management
by Colin Champ, M.D.
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Intermittent Fasting and Carbohydrate Restriction in Cancer Management

Current cancer treatments include chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, little is known about how intermittent fasting, carbohydrate restriction, and a ketogenic diet interact with these treatment modalities. This presentation will review how these dietary aspect of an ancestral lifestyle interact with radiation therapy based on preclinical and clinical data. Pathways and lifestyle aspects will be reviewed, revealing the significant impact on cancer outcomes and clinical markers.

By:
Colin Champ, M.D.
August 17, 2013, 1:55 pm to 2:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Clinical
  Feed Your Head Workshop
by Shauna Young, Ph.D., CTN
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Feed Your Head Workshop

This workshop is for anyone who knows someone that is DX’d with an Autism spectrum disorder, those that are currently working with people with ASD’s, those who want to understand how a “targeted” Paleo/Primal works in the brain, anyone thinking about starting a family and wants to take all the precautions they can to avoid being in the current 1 out of 50 children with Autism. Pre-registration recommended. All will be welcome to attend, but only those who register in advance will get a full copy of The Spectrum Balance Protocol and the science behind it.

By:
Shauna Young, Ph.D., CTN
August 17, 2013, 1:55 pm to 2:55 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: Clinical
2:00 pm  
2:05 pm  
2:10 pm Fatty Liver-—Is It the Fat's Fault?
by Victoria Prince, M.D./Ph.D. student
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Fatty Liver-—Is It the Fat's Fault?

Fatty liver disease is a growing epidemic in the developed world, with some estimating that over 40% of the US population have some amount of disease. The general recommendations for those with fatty liver disease include avoiding saturated fats, though research does not support this recommendation. In fact, saturated fats have been shown to be protective against fatty liver disease with some even having a therapeutic effect. Conversely, consumption of large amounts of polyunsaturated fats that have only recently become abundant in western diets plays a key role in disease development.

By:
Victoria Prince, M.D./Ph.D. student
August 17, 2013, 2:10 pm to 2:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Academic
2:15 pm
2:20 pm
2:25 pm
2:30 pm
2:35 pm Metabolic Flexibility: What Is It, And Why Is It Important?
by J. Stanton, B.A.
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Metabolic Flexibility: What Is It, And Why Is It Important?

Life requires energy. Each of the trillions of cells in our bodies must convert fuel to energy in order to stay alive.
The ability to switch between glucose and fatty acids as fuel is called metabolic flexibility, and it's crucial to good health. Failure to switch appropriately impairs everything from glucose tolerance to appetite regulation, and creates a hormonal environment that promotes lean tissue catabolism, fat gain, and psychological stress.
Understanding metabolic flexibility, and consequences of its failure, is key to understanding the metabolic syndrome -- for researchers attempting to isolate its causes, and for individuals addressing their own metabolic issues.

By:
J. Stanton, B.A.
August 17, 2013, 2:35 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Did Cavemen Get Heartburn?
by Norm Robillard, Ph.D.
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Did Cavemen Get Heartburn?

A new theory suggests that acid reflux is caused by carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and microbe-induced gas pressure. The pressure drives acid reflux much like dropping a Mentos in a bottle of coke. Difficult-to-digest Carbohydrates lactose, fructose, resistant starch, fiber and sugar alcohols are most likely to cause malabsorption and symptoms of SIBO-related conditions such as GERD and IBS. A novel calculation called fermentation potential (FP) can measure the gut symptom potential of any food. The low FP approach was successfully tested in a small clinical study in the Boston area.

By:
Norm Robillard, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 2:35 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
 
2:40 pm  
2:45 pm  
2:50 pm  
2:55 pm    
3:00 pm Networking Break and Book Signing in Georgia pre-function area
by Darryl Edwards, J. Stanton, B.A., Jason Robert, Ph.D., Norm Robillard, Ph.D., Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., Risa Stein, Ph.D., Shauna Young, Ph.D., CTN
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Networking Break and Book Signing in Georgia pre-function area

By:
Darryl Edwards, J. Stanton, B.A., Jason Robert, Ph.D., Norm Robillard, Ph.D., Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., Risa Stein, Ph.D., Shauna Young, Ph.D., CTN
August 17, 2013, 3:00 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North
Yoga Movement Workshop
by Lynn Brandli
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Yoga Movement Workshop

This yoga class will emphasize creating alignment in body for optimizing systems: muscular strength and suppleness; bone and joint positioning; space and support for organic body; mindfulness for mental health; and breath as a tool for accessing self.

By:
Lynn Brandli
August 17, 2013, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: Atlanta 1 and 2 Track: General
3:05 pm
3:10 pm
3:15 pm
3:20 pm
3:25 pm
3:30 pm
3:35 pm
3:40 pm
3:45 pm
3:50 pm
3:55 pm
4:00 pm  
4:05 pm  
4:10 pm Time-restricted Feeding, an Overview of the Current Research and Practical Applications
by Jeffrey Rothschild, M.Sc. cand.
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Time-restricted Feeding, an Overview of the Current Research and Practical Applications

Time-restricted feeding is a method of intermittent fating which allows ad libitum energy intake within a window of 4-12 hours, inducing a 12-20h daily fasted window. A wide variety of health benefits have been seen in animal and human trials, this presentation will review the current research and suggest practical applications

By:
Jeffrey Rothschild, M.Sc. cand.
August 17, 2013, 4:10 pm to 4:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
Is Sun Worshipping Increasing Your Risk of Melanoma?
by Anastasia Boulais, M.B.B.S., B.Med.Sc.
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Is Sun Worshipping Increasing Your Risk of Melanoma?

Those of us familiar with the evolutionary medicine model have come to question many of the conventional public health recommendations and, along with them, the complete sun avoidance. Dr Anastasia Boulais will describe the delicate balance between the benefits and risks of sun worshipping based on current evidence. The talk will focus on particular patterns of sun exposure which may increase the risk of formation of cutaneous melanoma. Other factors, such as diet, vitamin D status and even training patterns, contributing to that risk will be discussed. Anastasia will conclude with an overview of protective lifestyle factors.

By:
Anastasia Boulais, M.B.B.S., B.Med.Sc.
August 17, 2013, 4:10 pm to 4:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: Clinical
An Ancient Perspective on Deconditioning in Low Back Pain
by James Steele, Ph.D. cand.
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An Ancient Perspective on Deconditioning in Low Back Pain

Low back pain (LBP) is a multifactorial issue that is prevalent across most human populations, westernised, rural and indigenous. Deconditioning of the lumbar extensor musculature is a commonly associated factor and has been shown prospectively to be a risk factor for development of LBP. Here an explanation concerning lumbar spine and pelvic anatomic evolution is offered in attempt to integrate these findings. It appears that anatomically modern humans may be predisposed to LBP as a consequence of their evolutionary heritage; the compromise of relatively strong hip/trunk extensors and relatively weak lumbar extensors in combination with a long flexible lumbar spine.

By:
James Steele, Ph.D. cand.
August 17, 2013, 4:10 pm to 4:35 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: Academic
 
4:15 pm  
4:20 pm  
4:25 pm  
4:30 pm  
4:35 pm Sleep Apnea, Attention Deficit Disorder and Small Jaws: Not Likely Things of the Past
by Kevin Boyd, M.S., D.D.S.
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Sleep Apnea, Attention Deficit Disorder and Small Jaws: Not Likely Things of the Past

Sleep Deprivation (SD) has only recently been shown to negatively impact childhood brain development; SD is closely associated with rising prevalence of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Malocclusion (crowded teeth/underdeveloped jaws) is a common finding amongst children diagnosed with SD. A rarity in pre-Industrial skeletal and fossilized specimens, malocclusion is now highly prevalent in Westernized cultures and often considered to be a lifestyle(non-communicable) condition closely related dietary issues in childhood. It is proposed that ancestral-type infant/childhood feeding regimens are essential for optimum development of jaws, teeth and face, and thus, could hypothetically provide protection against developing malocclusion, SD and/or ADD.

By:
Kevin Boyd, M.S., D.D.S.
August 17, 2013, 4:35 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: Academic
The Role of Diet in Dry Eye Disease
by Peter Polack, M.D., F.A.C.S.
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The Role of Diet in Dry Eye Disease

Dry Eye Disease (DED) has become a substantial economic burden to industrialized society. It is estimated to cost as much as $18K/year/patient in lost productivity for a total of $55B/year in the United States alone. Severe, untreated dry eye disease can result in significant morbidity and potential loss of vision. The role that diet plays in the inflammation and lipid abnormalities associated with dry eye disease has only recently been discovered and is still not widely accepted in the medical community.

By:
Peter Polack, M.D., F.A.C.S.
August 17, 2013, 4:35 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom Center Track: General
The Effect of Diet on Chronic Spinal Pain Disorders
by Paul Ralston, D.C.
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The Effect of Diet on Chronic Spinal Pain Disorders

Despite the high frequency of spinal related pain disorders, few patients or physicians understand or even acknowledge the role nutrition plays in pain perception. This presentation will explain the anatomy of the most common spinal structures responsible for being sources of pain. The lecture will also examine the robust role diet plays in increasing or decreasing the perception of pain.

By:
Paul Ralston, D.C.
August 17, 2013, 4:35 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom South Track: General
 
4:40 pm  
4:45 pm  
4:50 pm  
4:55 pm  
5:00 pm Closing remarks
by Aaron Blaisdell, Ph.D.
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Closing remarks

By:
Aaron Blaisdell, Ph.D.
August 17, 2013, 5:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Hall: Capitol Ballroom North Track: General
5:05 pm
5:10 pm
5:15 pm
5:20 pm
5:25 pm

Legend

 General  Academic Clinical Break